Representing the Advantaged

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Opis: Representing the Advantaged - Daniel Butler

Political inequality is a major issue in American politics, with racial minorities and low-income voters receiving less favorable representation. Scholars argue that this political inequality stems largely from differences in political participation and that if all citizens participated equally we would achieve political equality. Daniel M. Butler shows that this common view is incorrect. He uses innovative field and survey experiments involving public officials to show that a significant amount of bias in representation traces its roots to the information, opinions, and attitudes that politicians bring to office and suggests that even if all voters participated equally, there would still be significant levels of bias in American politics because of differences in elite participation. Butler's work provides a new theoretical basis for understanding inequality in American politics and insights into what institutional changes can be used to fix the problem. Advance praise: 'A fascinating study of how America's politicians respond to their constituents. Butler's novel and compelling experiments show that elected officials often (but not always) discriminate against their own constituents who hold lower-status jobs, who identify with the opposite party, or who belong to a different racial or ethnic group. By systematically studying thousands of state and local officials, Butler brings solid new evidence to bear on questions at the heart of democratic governance.' Martin Gilens, Princeton University Advance praise: 'This path-breaking book is the first to use field experiments to investigate public officials' responsiveness to their constituents' requests and inquiries. Its thought-provoking conclusions about the role of race, class, and gender are sure to inspire debate and a new wave of representation research.' Donald P. Green, Columbia University Advance praise: 'Representing the Advantaged is a must-read for anyone interested in identifying the elite roots of income and racial inequality in contemporary American democracy. Butler persuasively argues that informational and attitudinal biases of elected officials affect the quality of political representation. Using field experiments, Butler shows that these biases impede responsiveness by legislators and other elected officials to disadvantaged constituents. This book changed the way I think about political representation.' Christian Grose, University of Southern California Advance praise: 'Representing the Advantaged is one of the most important books on representation that I have read in a long time. The methodological approach is innovative, the theoretical insights are illuminating, and the results - particularly regarding the unique disadvantages that racial and ethnic minorities face - are disconcerting. Butler does a tremendous job of highlighting a central weakness in our democracy.' Vincent Hutchings, University of Michigan1. Representatives as the source of bias; 2. When can representation break down?; 3. Details of the constituency-service field experiments; 4. Bias in the way officials process constituents' opinions; 5. Information costs and officials' proactive effort levels; 6. Direct discrimination; 7. Bias in politics.


Szczegóły: Representing the Advantaged - Daniel Butler

Tytuł: Representing the Advantaged
Autor: Daniel Butler
Producent: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107075726
Rok produkcji: 2014
Ilość stron: 158
Oprawa: Twarda
Waga: 0.38 kg


Recenzje: Representing the Advantaged - Daniel Butler

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Representing the Advantaged

Political inequality is a major issue in American politics, with racial minorities and low-income voters receiving less favorable representation. Scholars argue that this political inequality stems largely from differences in political participation and that if all citizens participated equally we would achieve political equality. Daniel M. Butler shows that this common view is incorrect. He uses innovative field and survey experiments involving public officials to show that a significant amount of bias in representation traces its roots to the information, opinions, and attitudes that politicians bring to office and suggests that even if all voters participated equally, there would still be significant levels of bias in American politics because of differences in elite participation. Butler's work provides a new theoretical basis for understanding inequality in American politics and insights into what institutional changes can be used to fix the problem. Advance praise: 'A fascinating study of how America's politicians respond to their constituents. Butler's novel and compelling experiments show that elected officials often (but not always) discriminate against their own constituents who hold lower-status jobs, who identify with the opposite party, or who belong to a different racial or ethnic group. By systematically studying thousands of state and local officials, Butler brings solid new evidence to bear on questions at the heart of democratic governance.' Martin Gilens, Princeton University Advance praise: 'This path-breaking book is the first to use field experiments to investigate public officials' responsiveness to their constituents' requests and inquiries. Its thought-provoking conclusions about the role of race, class, and gender are sure to inspire debate and a new wave of representation research.' Donald P. Green, Columbia University Advance praise: 'Representing the Advantaged is a must-read for anyone interested in identifying the elite roots of income and racial inequality in contemporary American democracy. Butler persuasively argues that informational and attitudinal biases of elected officials affect the quality of political representation. Using field experiments, Butler shows that these biases impede responsiveness by legislators and other elected officials to disadvantaged constituents. This book changed the way I think about political representation.' Christian Grose, University of Southern California Advance praise: 'Representing the Advantaged is one of the most important books on representation that I have read in a long time. The methodological approach is innovative, the theoretical insights are illuminating, and the results - particularly regarding the unique disadvantages that racial and ethnic minorities face - are disconcerting. Butler does a tremendous job of highlighting a central weakness in our democracy.' Vincent Hutchings, University of Michigan1. Representatives as the source of bias; 2. When can representation break down?; 3. Details of the constituency-service field experiments; 4. Bias in the way officials process constituents' opinions; 5. Information costs and officials' proactive effort levels; 6. Direct discrimination; 7. Bias in politics.

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Cena 284,00 PLN
Nasza cena 265,53 PLN
Oszczędzasz 6%
Wysyłka: Niedostępna
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