The Sustainable Laboratory Handbook

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Opis: The Sustainable Laboratory Handbook

The first comprehensive guide to modern laboratory planning in ten years to address both construction and operating aspects. Many of the 30 authors are affiliated with the European Association for Sustainable Laboratory Technologies (EGNATON), which has also endorsed this ready reference. This expert team covers the entire lifecycle of a laboratory facility, starting with the site layout and the planning of the building, followed by the planning of such areas as housing for laboratory animals, clean rooms and production facilities. The next section of the book deals with the installation of laboratory equipment, including storage and emergency facilities, while the final parts address safety and sustainability standards applicable to laboratories, as well as facility management and optimization during normal laboratory operation. The relevant norms and standards are cited throughout, and examples from recent construction sites are also presented. Hundreds of photographs and drawings, many in full color, provide visual examples of the design and building concepts. As a result, readers will learn how to construct and maintain efficient and long-serving laboratory spaces with a minimum of maintenance costs and a maximum of safety. An invaluable, practical guide for planners, builders and managers of chemical, biological and medical research laboratories of any size.List of Contributors XXIII Preface XXVII Part I Laboratory Building and Laboratory Equipment - Subjects of Laboratory Design of Building and Equipment 1 Egbert Dittrich 1 Introduction: Laboratory Typologies 3 Christoph Heinekamp 1.1 Purpose 4 1.2 Science Direction 5 1.3 Fields of Activities 6 1.4 Working Methods 8 1.5 Physical Structure 8 1.6 Conclusion 12 2 Requirements and Determination of Requirements 13 Christoph Heinekamp 2.1 Area Misuse throughWrong Grids 16 3 Laboratory Concept andWorkstations 21 Christoph Heinekamp 4 Determination of User Needs - Goal-Oriented Communication between Planners and Users as a Basis for Sustainable Building 31 Berthold Schiemenz and Stefan Krause 4.1 Work Areas 33 4.2 Work Flows and Room Groups 34 5 Corporate Architecture - Architecture of Knowledge 37 Tobias Ell 5.1 Image-The Laboratory as a Brand 38 5.2 Innovation-The Laboratory as the Origin of Knowledge 39 5.3 Excellence: The Laboratory as a Magnet for High Potentials 40 6 Scheduler Tasks in the Planning Process 43 Markus Hammes 6.1 Project Preparation 44 6.2 Integral Planning Teams 44 6.3 User Participation 45 6.4 Planning Process 45 6.5 Execution Phase 46 6.6 Commissioning 46 6.7 Conclusion 47 6.8 Best Practice 47 7 Space for Communication in the Laboratory Building 55 Markus Hammes 7.1 Definition of Terms 55 7.2 Historical Development 56 7.3 Development in the Modern Age- Why and When Were These Ideal Conceptions Lost? 57 7.4 Conclusion for Future Concepts 61 8 Fire Precautions 63 Markus Bauch 8.1 Preventive Fire Protection 63 8.2 Fire Protection Solution for Laboratory Buildings 69 8.3 Fire Protection Solutions for Laboratory Buildings - Examples 70 Part II Layout of Technical Building Trades 77 Egbert Dittrich 9 Development in Terms of Building Technology and Requirements of Technical Building Equipment 81 Hermann Zeltner 9.1 Field of Research 82 9.2 Required Flexibility of Laboratory Areas 83 9.3 Number of Floors, Height of the Floor, and Development Extent of the Laboratory Area (Laboratory Landscape) 85 9.4 Plumbing Services 86 9.5 Electrical Installation 88 9.6 Ventilation 89 9.7 Determination and Optimization of the Air Changes Quantities and Definition of Air Systems Required 90 9.8 Creation of an Energy-Optimized Duct System 93 10 Ventilation and Air Conditioning Technology 95 Roland Rydzewski 10.1 Introduction 95 10.2 Air Supply of Laboratory Rooms 96 10.3 Air-Flow Routing in the Room 99 10.4 Numerical Flow Simulation (Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)) 102 10.5 Energy-Efficient Systems Engineering 110 10.6 Installation Concepts for Laboratory Buildings from the Point of View of Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Planning 114 11 Electrical Installations 119 Oliver Engel 11.1 Power Supply 119 11.2 Lightings 126 11.3 Data Networks 127 11.4 Central Building Control System 129 12 Service Systems via Ceiling 133 Hansjurg Ludi 12.1 General Discussion 133 12.2 Flexible Laboratory Room Sizes/Configuration 134 12.3 Major Differentiating Components 139 13 Laboratory Logistics 145 Ines Merten 13.1 Classic Systems 145 13.2 Centralization and Implementation of Logistics Systems in the Building 146 13.3 Consignment and Automatic Storage Facilities 148 13.4 Solvents - Supply and Disposal Systems 150 13.5 LaboratoryWork 2030 - Objective? 152 13.6 From Small Areas to the Big Picture 153 13.7 Local Transport Systems 153 13.8 Supply and Disposal of Chemicals at theWorkplace 153 13.9 Perspective 154 14 Animal Housing 157 Ina-Maria Muller-Stahn 14.1 General Points 157 14.2 Planning of an Animal Facility 158 14.3 SPF Management of Animals 159 14.4 Animal Management under SPF Status 164 14.5 Decentralized Connection of IVC 165 14.6 Central Connection 165 14.7 Extract Air 165 14.8 Supply through the Barrier 166 14.9 Quarantine 167 14.10 Open Animal Management without Hygiene Requirements 167 14.11 Experimental Animal Facility 168 14.12 Sustainability - An Issue in an Animal Facility? 168 15 Technical Research Centers - Examples of Highly Sophisticated Laboratory Planning Which Cannot be Schematized 171 Thomas Lischke and Maike Ring 16 Clean Rooms 175 Thomas Lischke 16.1 Wall materials 178 16.2 Ceilings 179 16.3 Fixtures and fittings 179 17 Safety Laboratories 181 Michael Staniszewski 17.1 General Remark 181 17.2 Types of Safety Laboratories 182 17.3 Building Structures 190 Part III Laboratory Casework and Installations 195 Egbert Dittrich 18 Laboratory Casework 197 Egbert Dittrich 18.1 Design 197 18.2 Functionality and Flexibility 200 18.3 Trends 201 19 Work Benches, Sinks, Storage, Supply- and Disposal Systems 203 Egbert Dittrich 19.1 Benches 203 19.2 Sinks 204 19.3 Under Bench Units, Cabinets, Storage Cabinets 208 19.4 Supply and Disposal Systems 211 19.5 Service Carrying Frames 215 20 Fume Cupboards and Ventilated Units 225 Egbert Dittrich 20.1 Technical Data and Selection Criteria 225 20.2 Fume Cupboards and Sustainability 231 20.3 Ventilation Control and Monitoring 231 20.4 Fume Cupboard Monitoring, -Control and Room Control 234 20.5 Laboratory Control 235 20.6 Sash Controller 238 21 Laboratory Furniture Made fromStainless Steel - for Clean-Rooms, Labs, Medical-, and Industry Applications 241 Eberhard Durr 21.1 Areas for Stainless Steel Equipment 241 21.2 Hygienic Requirements of Surfaces 242 21.3 How to Clean and Disinfect Stainless Steel Surfaces 243 21.4 Cleanliness Classes for Sterile Areas 245 21.5 Microorganisms 246 21.6 Summary 253 22 Clean Benches and Microbiological Safety Cabinets 255 Walter Gluck 22.1 Laboratory Clean Air Instrument, in General and Definition(s) 255 22.2 Possible Joint Possession of "Clean Benches" and "Microbiological Safety Cabinets" 256 22.3 Laboratory Clean Air Instruments Intended to Protect the Samples - "Clean Benches" 258 22.4 Microbiological Safety Cabinets 261 22.5 Microbiological Safety Cabinet Class 1 263 22.6 Microbiological Safety Cabinets Class 2 265 22.7 Enhanced Microbiological Safety Cabinets Class 2 266 22.8 Enhanced Safety of Safety Cabinet Class 2 by Means of Redundant HEPA Filter(s) 269 22.9 Microbiological Safety Cabinet Class 3 271 22.10 Inactivation of Cabinet and Filters 271 23 Safety Cabinets 273 Christian Volk 23.1 History - the Development of the Safety Cabinet 273 23.2 Safety Cabinets for Flammable Liquids 274 23.3 Safety Cabinets for Pressurized Gas Cylinders 285 23.4 Safety Cabinets for Acids and Lyes 289 23.5 Test Markings for Safety Cabinets 291 23.6 Special Solutions for the Storage of Flammable Liquids 292 24 Laboratory Service Fittings forWater, Fuel Gases, and Technical Gases 297 Thomas Gasdorf 24.1 Medium 297 24.2 Temperature 297 24.3 Dosing Task 298 24.4 Safety 298 24.5 Place of Installation 298 24.6 Ease of Installation 298 24.7 Materials 299 24.8 Headwork 300 24.9 Seals 300 24.10 According to Standard 300 24.11 Water 300 24.12 Conclusion 305 24.13 Burning Gas 307 24.14 Technical Gases up to 4.5 Purity Grade 310 24.15 Vacuum 313 25 Gases and Gas Supply Systems for Ultra-Pure Gases up to Purity 6.0 317 Franz Wermelinger 25.1 Gases and Status Types 317 25.2 Material Compatibility 319 25.3 Connection Points 319 25.4 Impurities 319 25.5 Supply Systems: Central Building Supply/Local Supply and Laboratory Supply 320 25.6 Central Building Supply (CBS) 323 25.7 Pipe Networks and Zone Shut-Off Valves with Filter 324 25.8 Fitting Supports and Tapping Spots 325 25.9 Local Laboratory Gas Supply 327 25.10 Surfaces - Coatings 327 25.11 Inspections 328 25.12 Operation Start-Up and Instruction of the Operating Staff 328 26 Emergency Devices 333 Thomas Gasdorf 26.1 General 333 26.2 Body Showers 334 26.3 Eye-Washer 334 26.4 Emergency Shower Combinations 334 26.5 Hygiene 335 26.6 Testing and Maintenance 335 26.7 Complementary Products 335 Part IV Sustainability and Laboratory Operation 339 27 Sustainability Certification - Assessment Criteria and Suggestions 341 Egbert Dittrich 27.1 Certification Systems 342 27.2 Individual Strategies to Implement Sustainability 345 28 Reducing Laboratory Energy Use with Demand-Based Control 351 Gordon P. Sharp 28.1 Reducing Fume Cupboard Flows 351 28.2 ReduceThermal Load Flow Drivers 352 28.3 Vary and Reduce Average ACH Rate Using Demand-Based Control 353 28.4 A New Sensing Approach Provides a Cost-Effective Solution 354 28.5 Demand-Based Control (DBC) Improves Beam Use 355 28.6 A Few Comments on New Lab Ventilation Standards and Guidelines 356 28.7 Case Studies 357 28.8 Capital Cost Reduction Impacts of Demand-Based Control 361 28.9 Conclusions on Lab Energy Efficient Control Approaches 362 References 362 29 Lab Ventilation and Energy Consumption 363 Peter Dockx 29.1 Introduction 363 29.2 Step 1: Minimize Demand! 365 29.3 Step 2: Design Energy Friendly Systems 369 29.4 Step 3: Install and Proper Commission the Installation 374 29.5 Step 4: Maintain the Installation and Monitor 374 29.6 Step 5: Use of Alternative Energy 375 29.7 Conclusion 378 30 Consequences of the 2009 Energy-Saving Ordinance for Laboratories 379 Fritz Runge and Jorg Petri 30.1 The Task Force 379 30.2 Energy Certificates for Laboratory Buildings 380 30.3 Special Energy Characteristics of Laboratory Buildings 385 30.4 Reference Values for the Energy Consumption of Laboratory Buildings 386 30.5 Energy Consumption Values 387 30.6 Reference Quantities 387 30.7 Groups with Homogeneous Characteristics 391 30.8 Conclusions from the Results of the Investigations 392 30.9 Example for the Issue of a Consumption-Based Energy Certificate for a Laboratory Building 394 30.10 Summary 396 Part V Standards and Test Regulations 399 Egbert Dittrich 31 Legislation and Standards 401 Burkhard Winter 31.1 Introduction 401 31.2 Laboratory Planning and Building 402 31.3 Regulations for Labor Safety and Occupational Health 406 References 410 32 Examination, Requirements, and Handling of Fume Cupboards 413 Bernhard Mohr and Bernd Schubert 32.1 Introduction 413 32.2 Principle of Operation 414 32.3 Types of Fume Cupboards 417 32.4 Standards 424 32.5 Safety Criterion 427 32.6 Fume Cupboard Testing 429 32.7 Influences of Real Conditions 432 Part VI Safety in Laboratories 437 Egbert Dittrich 33 Health and Safety - An Inherent Part of Sustainability 439 Thomas Brock 33.1 Scope 439 33.2 Legal Foundations 441 33.3 Laboratory Guidelines 443 33.4 Hazardous Substances 446 33.5 Biological Agents 446 33.6 Other Hazards 447 33.7 Occurrence of Accidents and Illnesses 448 33.8 Risk Assessment and Measures 449 References 454 34 Operational Safety in Laboratories 455 Norbert Teufelhart 34.1 Safety Principles 455 34.2 Safety Management 456 34.3 Regulation of Internal Processes 459 34.4 Functional Efficiency of Systems and Equipment 462 34.5 Occupational Medical Care 463 34.6 Employment Restrictions 465 34.7 Access Regulations and Protection againstTheft 466 34.8 Cleanliness and Hygiene 467 34.9 Operation of Safety Systems According to Regulations 472 34.10 Operational Safety in Laboratories - Conclusion 479 34.11 Laboratory Rules and Regulations (Sample) 480 34.12 Testing Equipment Registry (Sample) 486 34.13 Screening Examinations for Laboratory Activities (Selection) 488 34.14 Skin Protection Plan (Sample) 492 References 495 Part VII Laboratory Operation 497 Helmut Martens 35 Facility Management in the Life Cycle of Laboratory Buildings 499 Andreas Kuhne and Ali-Yetkin Ozcan 35.1 Self-Understanding and Background 499 35.2 Process Optimization 500 35.3 FM in the Life Cycle of a Laboratory Building 500 35.4 Concept Phase Laboratory Building 502 35.5 Construction Phase 504 35.6 Use Phase 504 35.7 Revitalization Phase 505 35.8 Deconstructing Phase 507 35.9 Benefits of FM 507 36 Laboratory Optimization 509 Helmut Martens 36.1 The Procedure 510 36.2 The Actual Recording 511 36.3 Determination of the Optimization Potential 512 36.4 Planning and Implementation 513 36.5 Permanent Need for Optimization 514 36.6 An Example 515 36.7 Utilization of Staff 516 36.8 Utilization of Equipment 517 36.9 Employee Retention, Employee Retention Time, Device Runtime 518 36.10 Another Example 518 36.11 Cost 518 36.12 Logistics 519 36.13 Quality 520 36.14 Customer Satisfaction and Customer Loyalty 520 36.15 Laboratory Indicators 521 37 Quality Management 523 Helmut Martens 37.1 Quality Control 523 37.2 Quality Assurance 523 37.3 Quality Management 523 37.4 Creation and Maintenance of a Quality Management System 524 37.5 The Purpose of Systematic Quality Management 525 37.6 Integrated Management Systems 525 37.7 Certification or Accreditation 526 37.8 International Recognition of Accreditation 527 37.9 Central Functions of Quality Management 527 37.10 Responsibilities of the Quality Manager in Practice 529 37.11 Implementation of a Quality Management System in the Laboratory 529 37.12 Documents 530 37.13 Expiration of Accreditation Project 532 38 Data 535 Helmut Martens 38.1 Data Systems 536 38.2 Data Systems at the Corporate Management Level 536 38.3 LIMS 537 38.4 LIMS Selection and Procurement 537 38.5 Requirements for a Specification 540 38.6 Selection of Suitable Suppliers 541 38.7 Data Privacy and Data Security 542 38.8 Risk Assessment 543 38.9 Safety Management 544 38.10 System Documentation 546 38.11 Emergency Plan 547 Index 549


Szczegóły: The Sustainable Laboratory Handbook

Tytuł: The Sustainable Laboratory Handbook
Producent: Blackwell Verlag GmbH
ISBN: 9783527335671
Rok produkcji: 2015
Ilość stron: 592
Oprawa: Twarda
Waga: 1.41 kg


Recenzje: The Sustainable Laboratory Handbook

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The Sustainable Laboratory Handbook

The first comprehensive guide to modern laboratory planning in ten years to address both construction and operating aspects. Many of the 30 authors are affiliated with the European Association for Sustainable Laboratory Technologies (EGNATON), which has also endorsed this ready reference. This expert team covers the entire lifecycle of a laboratory facility, starting with the site layout and the planning of the building, followed by the planning of such areas as housing for laboratory animals, clean rooms and production facilities. The next section of the book deals with the installation of laboratory equipment, including storage and emergency facilities, while the final parts address safety and sustainability standards applicable to laboratories, as well as facility management and optimization during normal laboratory operation. The relevant norms and standards are cited throughout, and examples from recent construction sites are also presented. Hundreds of photographs and drawings, many in full color, provide visual examples of the design and building concepts. As a result, readers will learn how to construct and maintain efficient and long-serving laboratory spaces with a minimum of maintenance costs and a maximum of safety. An invaluable, practical guide for planners, builders and managers of chemical, biological and medical research laboratories of any size.List of Contributors XXIII Preface XXVII Part I Laboratory Building and Laboratory Equipment - Subjects of Laboratory Design of Building and Equipment 1 Egbert Dittrich 1 Introduction: Laboratory Typologies 3 Christoph Heinekamp 1.1 Purpose 4 1.2 Science Direction 5 1.3 Fields of Activities 6 1.4 Working Methods 8 1.5 Physical Structure 8 1.6 Conclusion 12 2 Requirements and Determination of Requirements 13 Christoph Heinekamp 2.1 Area Misuse throughWrong Grids 16 3 Laboratory Concept andWorkstations 21 Christoph Heinekamp 4 Determination of User Needs - Goal-Oriented Communication between Planners and Users as a Basis for Sustainable Building 31 Berthold Schiemenz and Stefan Krause 4.1 Work Areas 33 4.2 Work Flows and Room Groups 34 5 Corporate Architecture - Architecture of Knowledge 37 Tobias Ell 5.1 Image-The Laboratory as a Brand 38 5.2 Innovation-The Laboratory as the Origin of Knowledge 39 5.3 Excellence: The Laboratory as a Magnet for High Potentials 40 6 Scheduler Tasks in the Planning Process 43 Markus Hammes 6.1 Project Preparation 44 6.2 Integral Planning Teams 44 6.3 User Participation 45 6.4 Planning Process 45 6.5 Execution Phase 46 6.6 Commissioning 46 6.7 Conclusion 47 6.8 Best Practice 47 7 Space for Communication in the Laboratory Building 55 Markus Hammes 7.1 Definition of Terms 55 7.2 Historical Development 56 7.3 Development in the Modern Age- Why and When Were These Ideal Conceptions Lost? 57 7.4 Conclusion for Future Concepts 61 8 Fire Precautions 63 Markus Bauch 8.1 Preventive Fire Protection 63 8.2 Fire Protection Solution for Laboratory Buildings 69 8.3 Fire Protection Solutions for Laboratory Buildings - Examples 70 Part II Layout of Technical Building Trades 77 Egbert Dittrich 9 Development in Terms of Building Technology and Requirements of Technical Building Equipment 81 Hermann Zeltner 9.1 Field of Research 82 9.2 Required Flexibility of Laboratory Areas 83 9.3 Number of Floors, Height of the Floor, and Development Extent of the Laboratory Area (Laboratory Landscape) 85 9.4 Plumbing Services 86 9.5 Electrical Installation 88 9.6 Ventilation 89 9.7 Determination and Optimization of the Air Changes Quantities and Definition of Air Systems Required 90 9.8 Creation of an Energy-Optimized Duct System 93 10 Ventilation and Air Conditioning Technology 95 Roland Rydzewski 10.1 Introduction 95 10.2 Air Supply of Laboratory Rooms 96 10.3 Air-Flow Routing in the Room 99 10.4 Numerical Flow Simulation (Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)) 102 10.5 Energy-Efficient Systems Engineering 110 10.6 Installation Concepts for Laboratory Buildings from the Point of View of Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Planning 114 11 Electrical Installations 119 Oliver Engel 11.1 Power Supply 119 11.2 Lightings 126 11.3 Data Networks 127 11.4 Central Building Control System 129 12 Service Systems via Ceiling 133 Hansjurg Ludi 12.1 General Discussion 133 12.2 Flexible Laboratory Room Sizes/Configuration 134 12.3 Major Differentiating Components 139 13 Laboratory Logistics 145 Ines Merten 13.1 Classic Systems 145 13.2 Centralization and Implementation of Logistics Systems in the Building 146 13.3 Consignment and Automatic Storage Facilities 148 13.4 Solvents - Supply and Disposal Systems 150 13.5 LaboratoryWork 2030 - Objective? 152 13.6 From Small Areas to the Big Picture 153 13.7 Local Transport Systems 153 13.8 Supply and Disposal of Chemicals at theWorkplace 153 13.9 Perspective 154 14 Animal Housing 157 Ina-Maria Muller-Stahn 14.1 General Points 157 14.2 Planning of an Animal Facility 158 14.3 SPF Management of Animals 159 14.4 Animal Management under SPF Status 164 14.5 Decentralized Connection of IVC 165 14.6 Central Connection 165 14.7 Extract Air 165 14.8 Supply through the Barrier 166 14.9 Quarantine 167 14.10 Open Animal Management without Hygiene Requirements 167 14.11 Experimental Animal Facility 168 14.12 Sustainability - An Issue in an Animal Facility? 168 15 Technical Research Centers - Examples of Highly Sophisticated Laboratory Planning Which Cannot be Schematized 171 Thomas Lischke and Maike Ring 16 Clean Rooms 175 Thomas Lischke 16.1 Wall materials 178 16.2 Ceilings 179 16.3 Fixtures and fittings 179 17 Safety Laboratories 181 Michael Staniszewski 17.1 General Remark 181 17.2 Types of Safety Laboratories 182 17.3 Building Structures 190 Part III Laboratory Casework and Installations 195 Egbert Dittrich 18 Laboratory Casework 197 Egbert Dittrich 18.1 Design 197 18.2 Functionality and Flexibility 200 18.3 Trends 201 19 Work Benches, Sinks, Storage, Supply- and Disposal Systems 203 Egbert Dittrich 19.1 Benches 203 19.2 Sinks 204 19.3 Under Bench Units, Cabinets, Storage Cabinets 208 19.4 Supply and Disposal Systems 211 19.5 Service Carrying Frames 215 20 Fume Cupboards and Ventilated Units 225 Egbert Dittrich 20.1 Technical Data and Selection Criteria 225 20.2 Fume Cupboards and Sustainability 231 20.3 Ventilation Control and Monitoring 231 20.4 Fume Cupboard Monitoring, -Control and Room Control 234 20.5 Laboratory Control 235 20.6 Sash Controller 238 21 Laboratory Furniture Made fromStainless Steel - for Clean-Rooms, Labs, Medical-, and Industry Applications 241 Eberhard Durr 21.1 Areas for Stainless Steel Equipment 241 21.2 Hygienic Requirements of Surfaces 242 21.3 How to Clean and Disinfect Stainless Steel Surfaces 243 21.4 Cleanliness Classes for Sterile Areas 245 21.5 Microorganisms 246 21.6 Summary 253 22 Clean Benches and Microbiological Safety Cabinets 255 Walter Gluck 22.1 Laboratory Clean Air Instrument, in General and Definition(s) 255 22.2 Possible Joint Possession of "Clean Benches" and "Microbiological Safety Cabinets" 256 22.3 Laboratory Clean Air Instruments Intended to Protect the Samples - "Clean Benches" 258 22.4 Microbiological Safety Cabinets 261 22.5 Microbiological Safety Cabinet Class 1 263 22.6 Microbiological Safety Cabinets Class 2 265 22.7 Enhanced Microbiological Safety Cabinets Class 2 266 22.8 Enhanced Safety of Safety Cabinet Class 2 by Means of Redundant HEPA Filter(s) 269 22.9 Microbiological Safety Cabinet Class 3 271 22.10 Inactivation of Cabinet and Filters 271 23 Safety Cabinets 273 Christian Volk 23.1 History - the Development of the Safety Cabinet 273 23.2 Safety Cabinets for Flammable Liquids 274 23.3 Safety Cabinets for Pressurized Gas Cylinders 285 23.4 Safety Cabinets for Acids and Lyes 289 23.5 Test Markings for Safety Cabinets 291 23.6 Special Solutions for the Storage of Flammable Liquids 292 24 Laboratory Service Fittings forWater, Fuel Gases, and Technical Gases 297 Thomas Gasdorf 24.1 Medium 297 24.2 Temperature 297 24.3 Dosing Task 298 24.4 Safety 298 24.5 Place of Installation 298 24.6 Ease of Installation 298 24.7 Materials 299 24.8 Headwork 300 24.9 Seals 300 24.10 According to Standard 300 24.11 Water 300 24.12 Conclusion 305 24.13 Burning Gas 307 24.14 Technical Gases up to 4.5 Purity Grade 310 24.15 Vacuum 313 25 Gases and Gas Supply Systems for Ultra-Pure Gases up to Purity 6.0 317 Franz Wermelinger 25.1 Gases and Status Types 317 25.2 Material Compatibility 319 25.3 Connection Points 319 25.4 Impurities 319 25.5 Supply Systems: Central Building Supply/Local Supply and Laboratory Supply 320 25.6 Central Building Supply (CBS) 323 25.7 Pipe Networks and Zone Shut-Off Valves with Filter 324 25.8 Fitting Supports and Tapping Spots 325 25.9 Local Laboratory Gas Supply 327 25.10 Surfaces - Coatings 327 25.11 Inspections 328 25.12 Operation Start-Up and Instruction of the Operating Staff 328 26 Emergency Devices 333 Thomas Gasdorf 26.1 General 333 26.2 Body Showers 334 26.3 Eye-Washer 334 26.4 Emergency Shower Combinations 334 26.5 Hygiene 335 26.6 Testing and Maintenance 335 26.7 Complementary Products 335 Part IV Sustainability and Laboratory Operation 339 27 Sustainability Certification - Assessment Criteria and Suggestions 341 Egbert Dittrich 27.1 Certification Systems 342 27.2 Individual Strategies to Implement Sustainability 345 28 Reducing Laboratory Energy Use with Demand-Based Control 351 Gordon P. Sharp 28.1 Reducing Fume Cupboard Flows 351 28.2 ReduceThermal Load Flow Drivers 352 28.3 Vary and Reduce Average ACH Rate Using Demand-Based Control 353 28.4 A New Sensing Approach Provides a Cost-Effective Solution 354 28.5 Demand-Based Control (DBC) Improves Beam Use 355 28.6 A Few Comments on New Lab Ventilation Standards and Guidelines 356 28.7 Case Studies 357 28.8 Capital Cost Reduction Impacts of Demand-Based Control 361 28.9 Conclusions on Lab Energy Efficient Control Approaches 362 References 362 29 Lab Ventilation and Energy Consumption 363 Peter Dockx 29.1 Introduction 363 29.2 Step 1: Minimize Demand! 365 29.3 Step 2: Design Energy Friendly Systems 369 29.4 Step 3: Install and Proper Commission the Installation 374 29.5 Step 4: Maintain the Installation and Monitor 374 29.6 Step 5: Use of Alternative Energy 375 29.7 Conclusion 378 30 Consequences of the 2009 Energy-Saving Ordinance for Laboratories 379 Fritz Runge and Jorg Petri 30.1 The Task Force 379 30.2 Energy Certificates for Laboratory Buildings 380 30.3 Special Energy Characteristics of Laboratory Buildings 385 30.4 Reference Values for the Energy Consumption of Laboratory Buildings 386 30.5 Energy Consumption Values 387 30.6 Reference Quantities 387 30.7 Groups with Homogeneous Characteristics 391 30.8 Conclusions from the Results of the Investigations 392 30.9 Example for the Issue of a Consumption-Based Energy Certificate for a Laboratory Building 394 30.10 Summary 396 Part V Standards and Test Regulations 399 Egbert Dittrich 31 Legislation and Standards 401 Burkhard Winter 31.1 Introduction 401 31.2 Laboratory Planning and Building 402 31.3 Regulations for Labor Safety and Occupational Health 406 References 410 32 Examination, Requirements, and Handling of Fume Cupboards 413 Bernhard Mohr and Bernd Schubert 32.1 Introduction 413 32.2 Principle of Operation 414 32.3 Types of Fume Cupboards 417 32.4 Standards 424 32.5 Safety Criterion 427 32.6 Fume Cupboard Testing 429 32.7 Influences of Real Conditions 432 Part VI Safety in Laboratories 437 Egbert Dittrich 33 Health and Safety - An Inherent Part of Sustainability 439 Thomas Brock 33.1 Scope 439 33.2 Legal Foundations 441 33.3 Laboratory Guidelines 443 33.4 Hazardous Substances 446 33.5 Biological Agents 446 33.6 Other Hazards 447 33.7 Occurrence of Accidents and Illnesses 448 33.8 Risk Assessment and Measures 449 References 454 34 Operational Safety in Laboratories 455 Norbert Teufelhart 34.1 Safety Principles 455 34.2 Safety Management 456 34.3 Regulation of Internal Processes 459 34.4 Functional Efficiency of Systems and Equipment 462 34.5 Occupational Medical Care 463 34.6 Employment Restrictions 465 34.7 Access Regulations and Protection againstTheft 466 34.8 Cleanliness and Hygiene 467 34.9 Operation of Safety Systems According to Regulations 472 34.10 Operational Safety in Laboratories - Conclusion 479 34.11 Laboratory Rules and Regulations (Sample) 480 34.12 Testing Equipment Registry (Sample) 486 34.13 Screening Examinations for Laboratory Activities (Selection) 488 34.14 Skin Protection Plan (Sample) 492 References 495 Part VII Laboratory Operation 497 Helmut Martens 35 Facility Management in the Life Cycle of Laboratory Buildings 499 Andreas Kuhne and Ali-Yetkin Ozcan 35.1 Self-Understanding and Background 499 35.2 Process Optimization 500 35.3 FM in the Life Cycle of a Laboratory Building 500 35.4 Concept Phase Laboratory Building 502 35.5 Construction Phase 504 35.6 Use Phase 504 35.7 Revitalization Phase 505 35.8 Deconstructing Phase 507 35.9 Benefits of FM 507 36 Laboratory Optimization 509 Helmut Martens 36.1 The Procedure 510 36.2 The Actual Recording 511 36.3 Determination of the Optimization Potential 512 36.4 Planning and Implementation 513 36.5 Permanent Need for Optimization 514 36.6 An Example 515 36.7 Utilization of Staff 516 36.8 Utilization of Equipment 517 36.9 Employee Retention, Employee Retention Time, Device Runtime 518 36.10 Another Example 518 36.11 Cost 518 36.12 Logistics 519 36.13 Quality 520 36.14 Customer Satisfaction and Customer Loyalty 520 36.15 Laboratory Indicators 521 37 Quality Management 523 Helmut Martens 37.1 Quality Control 523 37.2 Quality Assurance 523 37.3 Quality Management 523 37.4 Creation and Maintenance of a Quality Management System 524 37.5 The Purpose of Systematic Quality Management 525 37.6 Integrated Management Systems 525 37.7 Certification or Accreditation 526 37.8 International Recognition of Accreditation 527 37.9 Central Functions of Quality Management 527 37.10 Responsibilities of the Quality Manager in Practice 529 37.11 Implementation of a Quality Management System in the Laboratory 529 37.12 Documents 530 37.13 Expiration of Accreditation Project 532 38 Data 535 Helmut Martens 38.1 Data Systems 536 38.2 Data Systems at the Corporate Management Level 536 38.3 LIMS 537 38.4 LIMS Selection and Procurement 537 38.5 Requirements for a Specification 540 38.6 Selection of Suitable Suppliers 541 38.7 Data Privacy and Data Security 542 38.8 Risk Assessment 543 38.9 Safety Management 544 38.10 System Documentation 546 38.11 Emergency Plan 547 Index 549

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Szczegóły: The Sustainable Laboratory Handbook

Tytuł: The Sustainable Laboratory Handbook
Producent: Blackwell Verlag GmbH
ISBN: 9783527335671
Rok produkcji: 2015
Ilość stron: 592
Oprawa: Twarda
Waga: 1.41 kg


Recenzje: The Sustainable Laboratory Handbook

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