The Hawaiian Problem With an Appendix on Cuba and the Sugar Trust (Classic Reprint)

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Opis: The Hawaiian Problem - Stroever Carl

Excerpt from The Hawaiian Problem: With an Appendix on Cuba and the Sugar Trust
A stake of 4 I-2, and, with increased production and a higher duty, perhaps 8, million dollars a year explains much of the newspaper enthusiasm and much of the political fervor for absolute annexation of Hawaii to the United States as an integral part thereof. A mere protectorate, you know, would not secure free trade in sugar.
For Hawaii all sorts of troubles are threatening by reason of the miscellaneous character of the population with which regard for profits has peopled the Islands. It undoubtedly would be to the advantage of the big plantation corporations in particular (40 of them owned even in 1893 property worth 28 million dollars) to have these people kept in order by the United States at the expense of the general government, the revenues of which are not raised from Hawaii alone.
A further advantage would accrue to the Hawaiians, and again to the land-holding corporations in particular, if the United States would assume the Hawaiian debt. True that the United States are to have in consideration thereof the ownership of all the public property in Hawaii. But according to the treaty all revenue and proceeds of that property are to be applied for the benefit of the Islanders.
Hawaii, it may be said, would become responsible for the debt of the United States; therefore the United States ought to assume the debt of Hawaii. If annexation would increase the revenue of the United States correspondingly, this argument might be sound. But, as pointed out above, the United States would lose by annexation from 4 to 8 million dollars annually in import-duties, which Hawaiian sugar ought to pay after termination of the present treaty; not to speak of other expenses consequent on annexation which the prospective revenues from Hawaii hardly would cover. Hawaii ought to pay her own debts, even if annexed.
Our free trade friends likely will say that we can afford to forego some revenue from sugar for the benefit of getting it cheap. This argument is based on private gain, often the enemy of public weal.
About the Publisher
Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com
This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.


Szczegóły: The Hawaiian Problem - Stroever Carl

Tytuł: The Hawaiian Problem
Podtytuł: With an Appendix on Cuba and the Sugar Trust (Classic Reprint)
Autor: Stroever Carl
Wydawnictwo: FB &c Ltd
ISBN: 9781331701859
Języki: angielski
Rok wydania: 2015
Ilość stron: 34
Format: 15.2x22.9cm
Oprawa: Miękka


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The Hawaiian Problem
With an Appendix on Cuba and the Sugar Trust (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from The Hawaiian Problem: With an Appendix on Cuba and the Sugar Trust
A stake of 4 I-2, and, with increased production and a higher duty, perhaps 8, million dollars a year explains much of the newspaper enthusiasm and much of the political fervor for absolute annexation of Hawaii to the United States as an integral part thereof. A mere protectorate, you know, would not secure free trade in sugar.
For Hawaii all sorts of troubles are threatening by reason of the miscellaneous character of the population with which regard for profits has peopled the Islands. It undoubtedly would be to the advantage of the big plantation corporations in particular (40 of them owned even in 1893 property worth 28 million dollars) to have these people kept in order by the United States at the expense of the general government, the revenues of which are not raised from Hawaii alone.
A further advantage would accrue to the Hawaiians, and again to the land-holding corporations in particular, if the United States would assume the Hawaiian debt. True that the United States are to have in consideration thereof the ownership of all the public property in Hawaii. But according to the treaty all revenue and proceeds of that property are to be applied for the benefit of the Islanders.
Hawaii, it may be said, would become responsible for the debt of the United States; therefore the United States ought to assume the debt of Hawaii. If annexation would increase the revenue of the United States correspondingly, this argument might be sound. But, as pointed out above, the United States would lose by annexation from 4 to 8 million dollars annually in import-duties, which Hawaiian sugar ought to pay after termination of the present treaty; not to speak of other expenses consequent on annexation which the prospective revenues from Hawaii hardly would cover. Hawaii ought to pay her own debts, even if annexed.
Our free trade friends likely will say that we can afford to forego some revenue from sugar for the benefit of getting it cheap. This argument is based on private gain, often the enemy of public weal.
About the Publisher
Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com
This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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