The Fisheries Treaty Speech of Hon. William P. Frye, of Maine in the Senate of the United States, Tuesday, May 29, 1888 (Classic Reprint)
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Opis: The Fisheries Treaty - Frye William Pierce

Excerpt from The Fisheries Treaty: Speech of Hon. William P. Frye, of Maine in the Senate of the United States, Tuesday, May 29, 1888
When they ask for bread will you give them a stone; for tab, a serpent
If we have another war it will be on the ocean. Who will man our ships Eighty-five per cent, of the sailors on ships in the foreign trade are foreigners, owing the Republic no allegiance, willing to render her no service. These fisherman are 80 per cent. American citizens, 65 per cent. American birth; inured to hardship, constantly expected to the perils of the sea, brave, skillful, patriotic, they would respond to a man to the bugle-call of the country. Why should not the Republic Blond by them when they are in peril, when they are suffering wrong at the hands of a foreign power
Why, Mr. President, the greatness of a nation consists largely in its jealous care for its citizens, humble though they may be. King Theodore in 1863 or 1864 took Captain Cameron, an Englishman, prisoner, incarcerated him in the fortress of Magdala, on the top of a mountain 9,000 feet above the level of the sea. The Queen of Great Britain demanded his release; the King refused. Great Britain embarked at Bombay 4,000 British soldiers and 10,000 Sepoy's, landed them on the coast, marched them 400 miles through swamps and morasses, under a burning sun, led them up the mountain heights, gave battle to the enemy, battered down the wall, took that citizen like a brand from the burning, carried him down across the swamps and marshes, placed him on board a ship, and carried him home to England. What a magnificent exhibition of power for just one citizen! It cost Great Britain millions and millions of dollars; it made General Napier, Lord Napier of Magdala.
In the presence of such an incident one is so lost in admiration as almost to forget the injustice and the wrongs that same great country inflicts day by day upon her own citizens within her own borders.
There are Senators here now listening to me who can remember how their pulses quivered when they read that modest report sent by Commander Ingraham from Smyrna: "I weighed my anchor; I drew to within half a cable's length of the Austrian brig of war. Near her was a 10-gun schooner and two armed merchantmen ready to assist her. I ran up the American flag, shotted my guns, and demanded this poor fellow, who had no more American citizenship than the filing of his intention to become one, and he was surrendered."
I tell you, Senators, Incidents like that kindle the blood in every patriot's heart, and yet neither country did more than her duty required. The country that neglects its citizen, that permits him to be outraged by a foreign power, has no right to call on him when her hour of peril comes.
Now, Mr. President, I declare, and I do it in all humility, that this great, powerful Republic has shamefully neglected the rights of three American fishermen, has refused to listen to their cries, has given them a stone when they asked for broad again and again.
After the war of independence we met to make a treaty of peace. There were bold, courageous men in the land who loved their country and were jealous for its honor. The result was a treaty, by the terms of which every right of every fisherman, every right of this feeble Republic was provided for; ay, more, Great Britain went even to the extent of surrendering to us the right to fish on banks that were from 40 to 300 miles from the shore. Generous Great Britain giving to us that over which she had no more control than she had over the waters of mid-ocean! She never surrendered that which was hers, nor one jot nor one tittle of it, without adequate and fully adequate compensation. But we received then In our weakness, in our infancy, all that any patriot would ask.
But the arrogance of Great Britain displayed in the conduct of those negotiations continued, and ere long we found her seizing our .


Szczegóły: The Fisheries Treaty - Frye William Pierce

Tytuł: The Fisheries Treaty
Podtytuł: Speech of Hon. William P. Frye, of Maine in the Senate of the United States, Tuesday, May 29, 1888 (Classic Reprint)
Autor: Frye William Pierce
Wydawnictwo: FB &c Ltd
ISBN: 9781331563662
Języki: angielski
Rok wydania: 2015
Ilość stron: 30
Format: 15.2x22.9cm
Oprawa: Miękka


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The Fisheries Treaty
Speech of Hon. William P. Frye, of Maine in the Senate of the United States, Tuesday, May 29, 1888 (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from The Fisheries Treaty: Speech of Hon. William P. Frye, of Maine in the Senate of the United States, Tuesday, May 29, 1888
When they ask for bread will you give them a stone; for tab, a serpent
If we have another war it will be on the ocean. Who will man our ships Eighty-five per cent, of the sailors on ships in the foreign trade are foreigners, owing the Republic no allegiance, willing to render her no service. These fisherman are 80 per cent. American citizens, 65 per cent. American birth; inured to hardship, constantly expected to the perils of the sea, brave, skillful, patriotic, they would respond to a man to the bugle-call of the country. Why should not the Republic Blond by them when they are in peril, when they are suffering wrong at the hands of a foreign power
Why, Mr. President, the greatness of a nation consists largely in its jealous care for its citizens, humble though they may be. King Theodore in 1863 or 1864 took Captain Cameron, an Englishman, prisoner, incarcerated him in the fortress of Magdala, on the top of a mountain 9,000 feet above the level of the sea. The Queen of Great Britain demanded his release; the King refused. Great Britain embarked at Bombay 4,000 British soldiers and 10,000 Sepoy's, landed them on the coast, marched them 400 miles through swamps and morasses, under a burning sun, led them up the mountain heights, gave battle to the enemy, battered down the wall, took that citizen like a brand from the burning, carried him down across the swamps and marshes, placed him on board a ship, and carried him home to England. What a magnificent exhibition of power for just one citizen! It cost Great Britain millions and millions of dollars; it made General Napier, Lord Napier of Magdala.
In the presence of such an incident one is so lost in admiration as almost to forget the injustice and the wrongs that same great country inflicts day by day upon her own citizens within her own borders.
There are Senators here now listening to me who can remember how their pulses quivered when they read that modest report sent by Commander Ingraham from Smyrna: "I weighed my anchor; I drew to within half a cable's length of the Austrian brig of war. Near her was a 10-gun schooner and two armed merchantmen ready to assist her. I ran up the American flag, shotted my guns, and demanded this poor fellow, who had no more American citizenship than the filing of his intention to become one, and he was surrendered."
I tell you, Senators, Incidents like that kindle the blood in every patriot's heart, and yet neither country did more than her duty required. The country that neglects its citizen, that permits him to be outraged by a foreign power, has no right to call on him when her hour of peril comes.
Now, Mr. President, I declare, and I do it in all humility, that this great, powerful Republic has shamefully neglected the rights of three American fishermen, has refused to listen to their cries, has given them a stone when they asked for broad again and again.
After the war of independence we met to make a treaty of peace. There were bold, courageous men in the land who loved their country and were jealous for its honor. The result was a treaty, by the terms of which every right of every fisherman, every right of this feeble Republic was provided for; ay, more, Great Britain went even to the extent of surrendering to us the right to fish on banks that were from 40 to 300 miles from the shore. Generous Great Britain giving to us that over which she had no more control than she had over the waters of mid-ocean! She never surrendered that which was hers, nor one jot nor one tittle of it, without adequate and fully adequate compensation. But we received then In our weakness, in our infancy, all that any patriot would ask.
But the arrogance of Great Britain displayed in the conduct of those negotiations continued, and ere long we found her seizing our .

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Szczegóły: The Fisheries Treaty - Frye William Pierce

Tytuł: The Fisheries Treaty
Podtytuł: Speech of Hon. William P. Frye, of Maine in the Senate of the United States, Tuesday, May 29, 1888 (Classic Reprint)
Autor: Frye William Pierce
Wydawnictwo: FB &c Ltd
ISBN: 9781331563662
Języki: angielski
Rok wydania: 2015
Ilość stron: 30
Format: 15.2x22.9cm
Oprawa: Miękka


Recenzje: The Fisheries Treaty - Frye William Pierce

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