The Inglenook, Vol. 13 (Classic Reprint)
Książka
Wysyłka: Niedostępna
Sugerowana cena detaliczna 0 PLN
Dodaj do Schowka
Zaloguj się
Przypomnij hasło
×
×
Oferujemy szeroki asortyment - ponad 120 tys. produktów
Dysponujemy solidną wiedzą - działamy już 11 lat
Dbamy o wybór najcenniejszych tytułów
Opis: The Inglenook, Vol. 13 (Classic Reprint) - House Brethren Publishing

Excerpt from The Inglenook, Vol. 13
Poets and philosophers have delighted to picture in imagination the golden age of mankind which is yet to come. Freedom from the base things of life will be the happy lot of every human being. There shall be no crime, no poverty, no distress. Man will no longer strive against man and all shall be peace and plenty.
In contrast with that there appears an actual scene of today's world. On cold winter nights thousands of hungry and wretched men gather even as early as midnight to await the coming of early morn. Down the long line there is not a man but that shivers with the freezing cold, haggard, dejected, and penniless. In the morning they will receive a small "hand out" at the Bowery Mission, their only food perhaps for days. That is the "bread line of the Bowery."
What is poverty There is a normal standard of living below which if a person fall, poverty ensues. Food, lodging, and clothing sufficient to enable one to live in health and without physical discomfort constitute this standard. Lack of these things means poverty.
A very decided difference exists between poverty and pauperism. Poverty may not be a disgrace but pauperism is a crime. Robert Hunter in his standard work "Poverty" makes this distinction: "The mass of workingmen on the brink of poverty hate charity. The distinction between the poor and paupers may be seen everywhere. There are in all large cities in America and abroad, streets and courts and alleys where a class of people live who have lost all self-respect and ambition, who rarely, if ever, work, who are aimless and drifting, who like drink, who have no thought for their children, and who live more or less contentedly on rubbish and alms. These are the paupers; there is no mental agony here; they live miserably, but they do not care."
It has not been so many years since the belief was held that poverty was a moral punishment, and the unfortunate individual alone was to blame. The modern view regards it rather as an outgrowth of our "economic fabric." The two views blended together most likely will offer the true cause.
A universally recognized authority on this subject makes the startling statement that the number of those in poverty in the United States would not fall short of ten million people. If this be true, or near true, it is high time for the American nation to awake. England has become a land of poverty and pauperism. Are we to follow in her course There are over a half million Jews in New York City; one-fourth of them are beggars. Ten per cent of those who die in Manhattan receive a pauper burial. Chicago has on its hands a problem of the poor that threatens great danger. Every large city has similar conditions within its borders. It is an ever-increasing army, becoming all the more bold and shameless.
What are its causes They are legion - unemployment, sickness, accident, death, business depression, bad habits - some due to the individual, some to his environment. The first leads the list; the next two add their horrible quota. The loss of the bread-winner of the family, even but temporarily, means despair and dire distress for the helpless wife and children. Railroads, coal mines, and factories kill and injure many - in most cases avoidable, due either to carelessness or the greed for lucre.
There are countless thousands of families whose total income barely serves to keep them above the sinking line. When it is the least diminished, the normal necessities of life become impossible and the unfortunates sink into poverty, ofttimes never to rise again from the fearful slough.
Still another common cause of poverty is low wages. There is a certain, almost fixed limit below which wages can not go without lowering the standard of living. It is computed that $460 a year is necessary for a family of five in the city. In the rural districts it is, of course, lower. The wages of the unskilled laborer r


Szczegóły: The Inglenook, Vol. 13 (Classic Reprint) - House Brethren Publishing

Nazwa: The Inglenook, Vol. 13 (Classic Reprint)
Autor: House Brethren Publishing
Wydawnictwo: FB &c Ltd
Kod paskowy: 9781331497851
Języki: angielski
Ilość stron: 632
Format: 15.2x22.9cm
Oprawa: Miękka


Recenzje: The Inglenook, Vol. 13 (Classic Reprint) - House Brethren Publishing
Zaloguj się
Przypomnij hasło
×
×

Książka

The Inglenook, Vol. 13 (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from The Inglenook, Vol. 13
Poets and philosophers have delighted to picture in imagination the golden age of mankind which is yet to come. Freedom from the base things of life will be the happy lot of every human being. There shall be no crime, no poverty, no distress. Man will no longer strive against man and all shall be peace and plenty.
In contrast with that there appears an actual scene of today's world. On cold winter nights thousands of hungry and wretched men gather even as early as midnight to await the coming of early morn. Down the long line there is not a man but that shivers with the freezing cold, haggard, dejected, and penniless. In the morning they will receive a small "hand out" at the Bowery Mission, their only food perhaps for days. That is the "bread line of the Bowery."
What is poverty There is a normal standard of living below which if a person fall, poverty ensues. Food, lodging, and clothing sufficient to enable one to live in health and without physical discomfort constitute this standard. Lack of these things means poverty.
A very decided difference exists between poverty and pauperism. Poverty may not be a disgrace but pauperism is a crime. Robert Hunter in his standard work "Poverty" makes this distinction: "The mass of workingmen on the brink of poverty hate charity. The distinction between the poor and paupers may be seen everywhere. There are in all large cities in America and abroad, streets and courts and alleys where a class of people live who have lost all self-respect and ambition, who rarely, if ever, work, who are aimless and drifting, who like drink, who have no thought for their children, and who live more or less contentedly on rubbish and alms. These are the paupers; there is no mental agony here; they live miserably, but they do not care."
It has not been so many years since the belief was held that poverty was a moral punishment, and the unfortunate individual alone was to blame. The modern view regards it rather as an outgrowth of our "economic fabric." The two views blended together most likely will offer the true cause.
A universally recognized authority on this subject makes the startling statement that the number of those in poverty in the United States would not fall short of ten million people. If this be true, or near true, it is high time for the American nation to awake. England has become a land of poverty and pauperism. Are we to follow in her course There are over a half million Jews in New York City; one-fourth of them are beggars. Ten per cent of those who die in Manhattan receive a pauper burial. Chicago has on its hands a problem of the poor that threatens great danger. Every large city has similar conditions within its borders. It is an ever-increasing army, becoming all the more bold and shameless.
What are its causes They are legion - unemployment, sickness, accident, death, business depression, bad habits - some due to the individual, some to his environment. The first leads the list; the next two add their horrible quota. The loss of the bread-winner of the family, even but temporarily, means despair and dire distress for the helpless wife and children. Railroads, coal mines, and factories kill and injure many - in most cases avoidable, due either to carelessness or the greed for lucre.
There are countless thousands of families whose total income barely serves to keep them above the sinking line. When it is the least diminished, the normal necessities of life become impossible and the unfortunates sink into poverty, ofttimes never to rise again from the fearful slough.
Still another common cause of poverty is low wages. There is a certain, almost fixed limit below which wages can not go without lowering the standard of living. It is computed that $460 a year is necessary for a family of five in the city. In the rural districts it is, of course, lower. The wages of the unskilled laborer r

Powiadom o dostępności
Podaj swój e-mail a zostaniesz poinformowany jak tylko pozycja będzie dostępna.
×
Wysyłka: Niedostępna
Dodaj do Schowka
Zaloguj się
Przypomnij hasło
×
×

Szczegóły: The Inglenook, Vol. 13 (Classic Reprint) - House Brethren Publishing

Nazwa: The Inglenook, Vol. 13 (Classic Reprint)
Autor: House Brethren Publishing
Wydawnictwo: FB &c Ltd
Kod paskowy: 9781331497851
Języki: angielski
Ilość stron: 632
Format: 15.2x22.9cm
Oprawa: Miękka


Recenzje: The Inglenook, Vol. 13 (Classic Reprint) - House Brethren Publishing

Zaloguj się
Przypomnij hasło
×
×

Klienci, którzy kupili oglądany produkt kupili także:


Zaloguj się
Przypomnij hasło
×
×
Dodane do koszyka
×