Our Relations With the Chinese Empire (Classic Reprint)

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Opis: Our Relations With the Chinese Empire (Classic Reprint) - Williams S. Wells

Excerpt from Our Relations With the Chinese Empire
In 1839, before hostilities had actually commenced with the British, in consequence of his seizure of opium, Commissioner Lin found that the Americans had this reputation at Canton, and he endeavored to enlist them on his side in his efforts to suppress it. On one occasion, he sent a special agent to Macao, to request Rev. Mr. Bridgman, the American missionary, to come to him, supposing that he might have some influence in this direction. An interview was held, and although Lin was disappointed in his plan of intermediation, he learned many new ideas concerning the impending struggle, and the relative power of his own country and Great Britain, as well as the inefficiency of his attempt to prevent it. It was the first effort on the part of any Chinese official to open political relations with the Americans, and was in itself a tacit acknowledgment of the reputation which Mr. Bridgman had obtained among the people during his ten years' residence at Canton. At that time, the American trade was second in value to the British. The Chinese Government sincerely desired to stop only the opium trade and develop all other branches; but the British Government, ruled as it is by the shortsighted selfishness of trade, refused to cooperate in this despairing effort to restrain an evil of which its victims knew the effects better than their destroyers. England then lost a golden opportunity to elevate moral above mercenary motives in the eyes of a heathen people, which she has never recovered. She showed no desire to stay the destroying agency so profitable to herself.
The proposal of the American Government in 1844, to open political relations with the Court of Peking, was moi favorably received by it than a similar one from any other nation would have been at that moment, owing to this general opinion of its citizens; and the first article of Mr. Cushing's treaty of July, 1844, indicated the hopes of such a makeweight against the British. It read as follows:
"There shall be a perfect, permanent, and universal peace, and a sincere and cordial amity between the United States of America on the one part, and the Ta Tsing Empire on the other part, and between their people respectively, without exception of persons or places."
About the Publisher
Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com
This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.


Szczegóły: Our Relations With the Chinese Empire (Classic Reprint) - Williams S. Wells

Tytuł: Our Relations With the Chinese Empire (Classic Reprint)
Autor: Williams S. Wells
Wydawnictwo: FB &c Ltd
ISBN: 9781332519873
Języki: angielski
Rok wydania: 2015
Ilość stron: 20
Format: 15.2x22.9cm
Oprawa: Miękka


Recenzje: Our Relations With the Chinese Empire (Classic Reprint) - Williams S. Wells

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Our Relations With the Chinese Empire (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from Our Relations With the Chinese Empire
In 1839, before hostilities had actually commenced with the British, in consequence of his seizure of opium, Commissioner Lin found that the Americans had this reputation at Canton, and he endeavored to enlist them on his side in his efforts to suppress it. On one occasion, he sent a special agent to Macao, to request Rev. Mr. Bridgman, the American missionary, to come to him, supposing that he might have some influence in this direction. An interview was held, and although Lin was disappointed in his plan of intermediation, he learned many new ideas concerning the impending struggle, and the relative power of his own country and Great Britain, as well as the inefficiency of his attempt to prevent it. It was the first effort on the part of any Chinese official to open political relations with the Americans, and was in itself a tacit acknowledgment of the reputation which Mr. Bridgman had obtained among the people during his ten years' residence at Canton. At that time, the American trade was second in value to the British. The Chinese Government sincerely desired to stop only the opium trade and develop all other branches; but the British Government, ruled as it is by the shortsighted selfishness of trade, refused to cooperate in this despairing effort to restrain an evil of which its victims knew the effects better than their destroyers. England then lost a golden opportunity to elevate moral above mercenary motives in the eyes of a heathen people, which she has never recovered. She showed no desire to stay the destroying agency so profitable to herself.
The proposal of the American Government in 1844, to open political relations with the Court of Peking, was moi favorably received by it than a similar one from any other nation would have been at that moment, owing to this general opinion of its citizens; and the first article of Mr. Cushing's treaty of July, 1844, indicated the hopes of such a makeweight against the British. It read as follows:
"There shall be a perfect, permanent, and universal peace, and a sincere and cordial amity between the United States of America on the one part, and the Ta Tsing Empire on the other part, and between their people respectively, without exception of persons or places."
About the Publisher
Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com
This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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Szczegóły: Our Relations With the Chinese Empire (Classic Reprint) - Williams S. Wells

Tytuł: Our Relations With the Chinese Empire (Classic Reprint)
Autor: Williams S. Wells
Wydawnictwo: FB &c Ltd
ISBN: 9781332519873
Języki: angielski
Rok wydania: 2015
Ilość stron: 20
Format: 15.2x22.9cm
Oprawa: Miękka


Recenzje: Our Relations With the Chinese Empire (Classic Reprint) - Williams S. Wells

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