The Playgoer and Society Illustrated (Classic Reprint)

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Opis: The Playgoer and Society - Author Unknown

Excerpt from The Playgoer and Society: Illustrated
"The Whip." By Cecil Raleigh and Henry Hamilton.
Revived at Drury Lane Theatre on 26th March, 1910.
Messrs. Vincent Clive, Basil Gill, George Barrett, Cyril Keightley, Charles Rock, Alfred Bucklaw, Cecil Cameron, Austin G. Melford, Charles Blackall, and Misses Jessie Bateman. Fanny Brough, Nancy Price. Madge Fabian, May Warley, and others.
Wickedness and Virtue, and the constant struggle between them, have been revived at Drury Lane in "The Whip." Playgoers arc doubtless familiar with the story of "The Whip's" success; they remember how the callous William Sartorys turns the accident which befalls the Earl of Braneaster to his own wicked use. The hero's loss of memory through the accident is taken advantage of by the bad woman of the piece, Mrs. D'Aquila, at the instigation of the villain. Instead of turning her wicked head away with "Oh! fie!" or "How cruel," she says, "Yes! yes!" and forthwith consents to swear that Brancaster married her - before he lost his memory.
Poor Brancastcr spends all he has on the lawyers who try to get him out of this trouble, and his last hope of success is the winning of the Marquis of Beverley's racehorse, "The Whip," in the Two Thousand Guineas. Then the fun starts. The villain tries to wreck the horse-box and succeeds in doing it - but the horse has been saved. He next endeavours to get the jockey arrested just as he is about to ride - but Brancaster rushes the detectives and the crowd hold them prisoners until the race ends. Of course "The Whip" wins, and we see the downfall of wickedness and the triumph of virtue. No wonder the audience roared approval. The race scene is certainly one of the most realistic pieces of work ever put on the boards. The railway accident and the motor disaster have their thrills. The presence of real horses and real hounds on the stage meets with great appreciation from those in front, and the whole production has lost none of the humanity or the compelling interest in its revival.
It would be difficult to find a sweeter Lady Diana Sartorys than Miss Jessie Bateman, a more practical Mrs. Beamish than Miss Fanny Brough, a more heroic hero than Mr. Vincent Clive, a colder-blooded Sartorys than Mr. Cyril Keightley, or a more earnest parson than Mr. Basil Gill, while we can only be thankful that Miss Nancy Price in real life is a delightful contrast to the character she portrays in "The Whip." Mr. George Barrett makes a breezy old sportsman of Tom Lambert, and the Joe Kelly of Mr. Charles Roch is a really clever piece of work.
"The Rivals," by Sheridan.
Revived at the Lyric Theatre on 4th April, 1910.
Mr. Lewis Waller, Miss Kate Cutler, Messrs. C. W. Somerset, Cronin Wilson, Robert Loraine, Leonard Boyne, Herbert Jarman, Alec F. Thompson, Robert Bolder, Misses Lottie Venne, Dorothy Dir, and Beatrice Ferrar.
HEARTY congratulations to Mr. Lewis Waller and his excellent company on a most interesting rendering of Sheridan's immortal comedy. The story of "The Rivals" is so well known as to make repetition superfluous, and we are therefore more concerned with the interpretation of the work at the Lyric than with the plot. How many of our leading actors and actresses have been associated with one or another production of the play it would be difficult to say. The original cast, when produced at the Covent Garden Theatre in 1775, included the names of Mr. Shuter as Sir Antony Absolute, Mr. Woodward as Captain Absolute, Mr. Quick as Acres, Mrs. Green as Mrs. Malaprop, and Miss Barsanti as Lydia Languish. Since then revivals of the comedy have taken place in 1800, 1814, 1821, 1824, 1847, 1866, 1895, and as recently as 1900. "The Rivals" was Sheridan's first comedy. It was written when he was twenty-three years of age. Before pen was put to paper he would think out his comedies carefully and thoroughly, and it is said that his phrase at home was, "The comed


Szczegóły: The Playgoer and Society - Author Unknown

Nazwa: The Playgoer and Society Illustrated (Classic Reprint)
Autor: Author Unknown
Wydawnictwo: FB &c Ltd
Kod paskowy: 9781331037644
Języki: angielski
Ilość stron: 308
Format: 15.2x22.9cm
Oprawa: Miękka


Recenzje: The Playgoer and Society - Author Unknown

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The Playgoer and Society
Illustrated (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from The Playgoer and Society: Illustrated
"The Whip." By Cecil Raleigh and Henry Hamilton.
Revived at Drury Lane Theatre on 26th March, 1910.
Messrs. Vincent Clive, Basil Gill, George Barrett, Cyril Keightley, Charles Rock, Alfred Bucklaw, Cecil Cameron, Austin G. Melford, Charles Blackall, and Misses Jessie Bateman. Fanny Brough, Nancy Price. Madge Fabian, May Warley, and others.
Wickedness and Virtue, and the constant struggle between them, have been revived at Drury Lane in "The Whip." Playgoers arc doubtless familiar with the story of "The Whip's" success; they remember how the callous William Sartorys turns the accident which befalls the Earl of Braneaster to his own wicked use. The hero's loss of memory through the accident is taken advantage of by the bad woman of the piece, Mrs. D'Aquila, at the instigation of the villain. Instead of turning her wicked head away with "Oh! fie!" or "How cruel," she says, "Yes! yes!" and forthwith consents to swear that Brancaster married her - before he lost his memory.
Poor Brancastcr spends all he has on the lawyers who try to get him out of this trouble, and his last hope of success is the winning of the Marquis of Beverley's racehorse, "The Whip," in the Two Thousand Guineas. Then the fun starts. The villain tries to wreck the horse-box and succeeds in doing it - but the horse has been saved. He next endeavours to get the jockey arrested just as he is about to ride - but Brancaster rushes the detectives and the crowd hold them prisoners until the race ends. Of course "The Whip" wins, and we see the downfall of wickedness and the triumph of virtue. No wonder the audience roared approval. The race scene is certainly one of the most realistic pieces of work ever put on the boards. The railway accident and the motor disaster have their thrills. The presence of real horses and real hounds on the stage meets with great appreciation from those in front, and the whole production has lost none of the humanity or the compelling interest in its revival.
It would be difficult to find a sweeter Lady Diana Sartorys than Miss Jessie Bateman, a more practical Mrs. Beamish than Miss Fanny Brough, a more heroic hero than Mr. Vincent Clive, a colder-blooded Sartorys than Mr. Cyril Keightley, or a more earnest parson than Mr. Basil Gill, while we can only be thankful that Miss Nancy Price in real life is a delightful contrast to the character she portrays in "The Whip." Mr. George Barrett makes a breezy old sportsman of Tom Lambert, and the Joe Kelly of Mr. Charles Roch is a really clever piece of work.
"The Rivals," by Sheridan.
Revived at the Lyric Theatre on 4th April, 1910.
Mr. Lewis Waller, Miss Kate Cutler, Messrs. C. W. Somerset, Cronin Wilson, Robert Loraine, Leonard Boyne, Herbert Jarman, Alec F. Thompson, Robert Bolder, Misses Lottie Venne, Dorothy Dir, and Beatrice Ferrar.
HEARTY congratulations to Mr. Lewis Waller and his excellent company on a most interesting rendering of Sheridan's immortal comedy. The story of "The Rivals" is so well known as to make repetition superfluous, and we are therefore more concerned with the interpretation of the work at the Lyric than with the plot. How many of our leading actors and actresses have been associated with one or another production of the play it would be difficult to say. The original cast, when produced at the Covent Garden Theatre in 1775, included the names of Mr. Shuter as Sir Antony Absolute, Mr. Woodward as Captain Absolute, Mr. Quick as Acres, Mrs. Green as Mrs. Malaprop, and Miss Barsanti as Lydia Languish. Since then revivals of the comedy have taken place in 1800, 1814, 1821, 1824, 1847, 1866, 1895, and as recently as 1900. "The Rivals" was Sheridan's first comedy. It was written when he was twenty-three years of age. Before pen was put to paper he would think out his comedies carefully and thoroughly, and it is said that his phrase at home was, "The comed

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