Speech of Hon. Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee On the War for the Union; Delivered in the Senate of the United States, July 27, 1861 (Classic Reprint)
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Opis: Speech of Hon. Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee - Johnson Andrew

Excerpt from Speech of Hon. Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee: On the War for the Union; Delivered in the Senate of the United States, July 27, 1861
The Senate having under consideration the joint resolution(S. No.1) to approve and confirm certain acts of the President of the United States for suppressing insurrection end rebellion Mr. Johnson-, of Tennessee, said Mr. President: When I came from my heme to the seat of Government-, in compliance with the proclamation of the President of the United States calling us to-gether in extra session, it was not my intention to engage in any of the discussions that might transpire in this body; but since the session began, in consequence of the course that things have taken, I feel unwilling to allow the Senate to adjourn without saying a few words in response to many things that have been submitted to the Senate since its session commenced. What little I shall say -to-day will be without much method or order, I shall present the suggestions that occur to my mind, and shall endeavor to speak of the condition of the country as it is. On returning here, we find ourselves, as we were when we adjourned last spring, in the midst of a civil war. That war is now progressing, without much hope or prospect of a speedy termination. It seems to me, Mr. President, that our Government has reached one of three periods through which all Governments must pass. A nation, or a people, have first to pass through a fierce ordeal in obtaining thcirindependenceorseparation from the Government to which they were attached. In some instances this is a severe ordeal. We passed through such an one in the Revolution; we were seven years in effecting the separation, and in taking our position amongst the nations of the earth as a separate and distinct Power. Then, after having succeeded in establishing its independence, and taken its position among the nations of the earth, a nation must show its ability to maintain that position, that separate and distinct independence against other Powers, against foreign foes. In 1812, in the history of our Government, this ordeal commenced, and terminated in 1815. There is still another trial through which a nation must pass. It has to contend against internal foes; I against enemies at home; against those who have no confidence in its integrity, or in the institutions that may be established under its organic law. We are in the midst of this third ordeal, and the problem now being solved before the nations of the earth, and before the people of the United States, is whether we can succeed in maintaining ourseives against the internal foes of the Government; whether we can succeed in putting down traitors and treason, and in establishing the great fact that we have a Government with sufficient strength to maintain its existence against whatever combination may be presented in opposition to it. This brings me to a proposition laid down by the Executive in his recent message to the Congress of the United States. In that message the President said: This is essentially a peoples contest. On the side of the Union, it is a struggle for maintaining in the world, that form and substance of Government, whose leading object is to elevate the condition of men; to lift artificial weights from all shoulders; to clear the paths of laudable pursuit for all; to afford all an unfettered start, and a fair chance in the race of life. Yielding to partial and temporary departures, from necessity, this is the leading object of the Government, for whose existence we contend. I think the question is fairly and properly stated by the President, that it is a struggle whether the people shall rule; whether the people shall have a Government based upon their intelligence, upon their integrity, upon their purity of character, sufficient to govern themselves. I think this is the true issue; and the time has now arrived when the energies of the nation must be put forth, when there must be union and conce.


Szczegóły: Speech of Hon. Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee - Johnson Andrew

Tytuł: Speech of Hon. Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee
Podtytuł: On the War for the Union; Delivered in the Senate of the United States, July 27, 1861 (Classic Reprint)
Autor: Johnson Andrew
Wydawnictwo: FB &c Ltd
ISBN: 9781330624692
Języki: angielski
Rok wydania: 2015
Ilość stron: 26
Format: 15.2x22.9cm
Oprawa: Miękka


Recenzje: Speech of Hon. Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee - Johnson Andrew
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Speech of Hon. Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee
On the War for the Union; Delivered in the Senate of the United States, July 27, 1861 (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from Speech of Hon. Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee: On the War for the Union; Delivered in the Senate of the United States, July 27, 1861
The Senate having under consideration the joint resolution(S. No.1) to approve and confirm certain acts of the President of the United States for suppressing insurrection end rebellion Mr. Johnson-, of Tennessee, said Mr. President: When I came from my heme to the seat of Government-, in compliance with the proclamation of the President of the United States calling us to-gether in extra session, it was not my intention to engage in any of the discussions that might transpire in this body; but since the session began, in consequence of the course that things have taken, I feel unwilling to allow the Senate to adjourn without saying a few words in response to many things that have been submitted to the Senate since its session commenced. What little I shall say -to-day will be without much method or order, I shall present the suggestions that occur to my mind, and shall endeavor to speak of the condition of the country as it is. On returning here, we find ourselves, as we were when we adjourned last spring, in the midst of a civil war. That war is now progressing, without much hope or prospect of a speedy termination. It seems to me, Mr. President, that our Government has reached one of three periods through which all Governments must pass. A nation, or a people, have first to pass through a fierce ordeal in obtaining thcirindependenceorseparation from the Government to which they were attached. In some instances this is a severe ordeal. We passed through such an one in the Revolution; we were seven years in effecting the separation, and in taking our position amongst the nations of the earth as a separate and distinct Power. Then, after having succeeded in establishing its independence, and taken its position among the nations of the earth, a nation must show its ability to maintain that position, that separate and distinct independence against other Powers, against foreign foes. In 1812, in the history of our Government, this ordeal commenced, and terminated in 1815. There is still another trial through which a nation must pass. It has to contend against internal foes; I against enemies at home; against those who have no confidence in its integrity, or in the institutions that may be established under its organic law. We are in the midst of this third ordeal, and the problem now being solved before the nations of the earth, and before the people of the United States, is whether we can succeed in maintaining ourseives against the internal foes of the Government; whether we can succeed in putting down traitors and treason, and in establishing the great fact that we have a Government with sufficient strength to maintain its existence against whatever combination may be presented in opposition to it. This brings me to a proposition laid down by the Executive in his recent message to the Congress of the United States. In that message the President said: This is essentially a peoples contest. On the side of the Union, it is a struggle for maintaining in the world, that form and substance of Government, whose leading object is to elevate the condition of men; to lift artificial weights from all shoulders; to clear the paths of laudable pursuit for all; to afford all an unfettered start, and a fair chance in the race of life. Yielding to partial and temporary departures, from necessity, this is the leading object of the Government, for whose existence we contend. I think the question is fairly and properly stated by the President, that it is a struggle whether the people shall rule; whether the people shall have a Government based upon their intelligence, upon their integrity, upon their purity of character, sufficient to govern themselves. I think this is the true issue; and the time has now arrived when the energies of the nation must be put forth, when there must be union and conce.

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Szczegóły: Speech of Hon. Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee - Johnson Andrew

Tytuł: Speech of Hon. Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee
Podtytuł: On the War for the Union; Delivered in the Senate of the United States, July 27, 1861 (Classic Reprint)
Autor: Johnson Andrew
Wydawnictwo: FB &c Ltd
ISBN: 9781330624692
Języki: angielski
Rok wydania: 2015
Ilość stron: 26
Format: 15.2x22.9cm
Oprawa: Miękka


Recenzje: Speech of Hon. Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee - Johnson Andrew

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